nowness:

“We’ve split the issue into parts for women and for men; they meet in the middle with SEX”
Leaf through the latest issue of quarterly food bible Lucky Peach here.

nowness:

We’ve split the issue into parts for women and for men; they meet in the middle with SEX

Leaf through the latest issue of quarterly food bible Lucky Peach here.

Kare-Kare

I’m one of those people who appreciates NYC’s restaurant scene so much that I eat out 90% of the time. Well, the fact that my cooking skills aren’t up to par with my own standards either, I kept it in the back burner (pun intended). It’s very rare that I cook and lucky you, this are one of those moments. 

Last Sunday I decided to make a classic Filipino cuisine called “Kare-Kare”. 

Kare-Kare is a thick, savory stew made of peanut sauce, eggplant, bok choy, oxtail and tripe (optional). It’s not for the faint of hearts or picky eaters. This stew is served with shrimp paste on the side which adds another layer of flavor to it’s already rich sauce. The whole preparation takes time, about 3 hours. 

Although it’s time consuming, the recipe is pretty simple. Read on:

1. Cut your veggies into quarters

2. Sauteed garlic and onions

3. Add oxtail and tripe. Cook until brown.

4. Add beef stock and let it simmer for 2 hours.

5. Once the stock is thick, add Mamasita’s Kare-Kare mix. 

6. Add your veggies

7. Cook for another 25 minutes and you’re done!

If you want to cook it from scratch, check out this very well thought out blog for the full recipe, Panlasang Pinoy.

Enjoy!

themermaidnyc:

It’s Tuesday and you know what that means…. Crab Boil is tonight! Swim on in before they crawl out the door.All locations - *while supplies last.
$24 gets you a bucket of blue crabs, corn, potatoes and cornbread. Come on, get those hands dirty.  
Pic: via @ChubbyEatsNY blog

themermaidnyc:

It’s Tuesday and you know what that means…. Crab Boil is tonight! Swim on in before they crawl out the door.

All locations - *while supplies last.

$24 gets you a bucket of blue crabs, corn, potatoes and cornbread.
Come on, get those hands dirty.  

Pic: via @ChubbyEatsNY blog

Vietnamese Kitchen (Chelsea)

Co Ba 

110 9th Ave, New York, NY 10014

Neighborhood: Chelsea 

What makes this restaurant different?

Pork Belly!!

Nothing stirs my hunger than pork belly. Co Ba serves their entree caramelized and braised in coconut juice with tofu, daikon radish, and quail eggs. If you must know the name of the entree, it’s called “Thit ba roi kho” . Yeah, whatever that means.

Don’t forget to order:

Ca Bam: Wok and seared lemongrass curry monkfish with basil, chili, onions, and peanuts served with toasted sesame cracker. See photo.

Did You Know?

Vietnamese food is highly influenced by French as well as Chinese cuisine (in the north) which explains the diversity of their recipes from Banh Mi sandwich to a big bowl of seasoned broth, noodles and cooked vegetables. 

(Source: cobarestaurant.com)

Filipino Food

Filipino Food

There is one thing more exasperating than a wife who can cook and won’t, and that’s a wife who can’t cook and will. ~Robert Frost

Boqueria Flatiron (Lunch)

53 West 19th Street, NYC 10011
212.255.4160

What makes this restaurant different?

"It’s the seasoning". A simple croquette or steak sandwich were highlighted with a sauce that elevated each course to another level. Even the side salad, which most people ignore, is so tasty that it becomes part of your meal.

Did You Know? 

Boqueria means Public Market in Spanish?

Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria, located in Barcelona, Spain, is the oldest and the most famous public market in the world.

Highlights: 

Bocata Bistec $13

Hanger steak a la plancha, cured tomatoes
Mahón and Valdeón cheese, toasted Stirato bread


(Source: boquerianyc.com)

Ed Lobster Bar (Annex) , Lower East Side 

Highlights:

Mini Lobster Rolls

Fried Oyster sliders (w/o bacon)

Outdoor seating

Theme: Beach Town Cafe

(Source: lobsterbarnyc.com)